Last but not least, one of the worst things you can do when it comes to home improvements is to start a project without the major details—cost, time, materials, and design—as realistic as possible from the start. Nothing costs more than having to "change horses in midstream" (e.g., you want to move the fridge somewhere else now or want to change your tile choice). Use design tools to conceptualize your project and add a healthy buffer (10-15% more) to your time and financial budget to account for the inevitable surprises.
Once you’ve determined a realistic budget, you’ll need to clarify exactly what work can happen and when. You may also need to ask yourself some tough questions about what you really need versus what you simply want.  This will help you identify the true intention of the project and lay out important ground rules. It can even help with scheduling and determining what work happens when. 
According to Marc Appleton, “half the experience of living indoors is seeing the outdoors” So when remodeling your house install large windows. However, you might not have the budget to change your windows in that case play around with paint and paint your windows a shade lighter than the rest of the room to maximize the light coming through the windows.
If you jump into a remodeling project with an ambiguous contract or no contract at all, you may as well hire an attorney and set a court date right away. "The contract needs the right address, a start date, a completion date, and a detail of what is and is not going to be done," says Rosie Romero, founder of Legacy Custom Builders in Scottsdale, Arizona.
Existing conditions in a house can radically change the budget and scope of a renovation, as sometimes something as seemingly simple as adding an additional outlet to a room can result in the rewiring of an entire home. If you know, for example, that you occasionally blow a fuse when you turn on your hairdryer and have the dryer going on at the same time, that should be a hint that you may need to upgrade your electrical system. 
I’ve been planning to have my house renovated, but I am on a tight budget and I have no idea how will this work. I think paying for the project with money that I already have can help me save up money compared to paying interest if I take out a loan. Thanks for this; I should also start looking for a reliable contractor so we may proceed with the renovation.
Thanks for talking about the small details like air circulation in bathrooms. I never knew that you have to plan things like the mirrors around circulation, but now that I know that, I definitely want to get a professional remodeling contractor to do it for us. They would know what to look for and be able to do it well, so I’ll just leave it up to them! The air circulation in our bathroom right now is not very good, so that’s something I’d like to fix in our remodel.
Another area not to skimp on would be windows, doors, and insulation. Our last home had no insulation in the exterior walls, which is crazy considering Northeast Ohio’s climate! Literally the day we moved in, we drilled holes in the wall between every stud and blew in insulation with a blower we rented for the weekend. It cost us a bit up front, and patching the walls was a pain, but I know we made that money back in just one Ohio winter.
However, you may choose to add a clause in your cost-plus remodeling contract that pays a bonus if the contractor completes the project early or under budget. This is more an incentive than a show of appreciation, and can be a percentage of estimated money saved or a flat fee, perhaps $500 to $1,000 for a major project like a large kitchen remodel.
For bathrooms, overhead lighting is very important.  As for ambient options, you can always consider the use of a sunken track lighting, frosted glass fixtures, or even rice paper. Likewise, perimeter lighting is also capable of creating both soft, ambient glow, as well as useful light. It’s also highly advisable to consider using pendant lighting. Something like this allows the scattering of light into the direction that it gives the illusion of a beautiful centerpiece ceiling.

The walls of nearly any space set an instant tone of the space’s style and vibe. Bathroom walls are no exception. If your bathroom has peeling, crusty wallpaper or oddly tinted and speckled paint, the entire space is going to feel dingy, drab, and/or dated. Conversely, if your walls are clean and freshened up, the entire space will experience a pick-me-up in the style department.
Worn, tired carpet will not only turn off homebuyers, but it can make you feel worn and tired too. Replace it with the hottest trend in flooring: renewable, environmentally friendly bamboo. Solid-surface floors are easy to keep clean and give your home an upscale look and feel. Green flooring choices, like bamboo, minimally impact the environment and are a big selling point to today's environmentally conscious homebuyers.
If you have limited budget and need to keep the same footprint. Don’t worry, you can still give the impression that the space is a little bigger through the use of some tricks specifically made for that purpose. For instance, pedestal sinks are best known for making the room look more spacious, then clear glass shower doors are more preferable than the shower curtains on tubs as this would block the light and make it seem more enclosed. Likewise, you can also consider using a big mirror as an alternative to a small medicine cabinet mirror. Doing something like this could visually double the space around your vanity area.
This DIY project is actually not “a” project, but rather it’s many DIY projects with the unfortunate luck of being grouped into one larger heading. It’s intensive, it can be frustrating, and it’s a big deal. You want to get this one right, or your tub/shower is going to leak and crumble and you’ll curse the day you ever heard the acronym “D-I-Y.” On the flip side, a re-tiled shower/tub surround is gorgeous. It’s fresh, updated, and completely customized to your preferences. It alone can make showering a pleasure. And, truly, this is a completely DIY-able series of projects; doing it yourself will certainly help to keep your bathroom remodel cost lower.
Before you even call a remodeling company for your bathroom remodel, you should first talk with everyone who will be using the space. Try to have a discussion about the fixtures and finishes you are supposed to use and how much of a budget you’re willing to shell out. As you plan for your budget, it’s important to have a little extra, because you never know if there will be some unexpected problems that will increase the cost later on.
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